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Tai Chi Easy™ and knee pain

Tai Chi Easy™ may offer help to the millions of people impacted by knee arthritis.

 Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a major contributor to disability affecting 13 percent of women and 10 percent of men over age 60 (Zhang 2010). Knee OA significantly impacts movement, daily tasks and decreases quality of life and has psychological impacts (Mahir et al 2010).

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HHS Comments Submitted

Comments Submitted

The Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (CARA) required the Pain Management Best Practices Inter-Agency Task Force develop the Draft Report on Pain Management Best Practices: Updates, Gaps, Inconsistencies, and Recommendations (Draft Report) which identified gaps or inconsistencies, and proposed updates to best practices and recommendations for pain management, including chronic and acute pain. CARA also required the public to have an opportunity to provide comments on the Draft Report during a 90 day public comment period, which occurred December 31, 2018 – April 1, 2019. 

HWF President, Josie Weaver, has submitted comments on behalf of the Healer Within Foundation with input from Tom Rogers of the Qigong Institute and Dr. Rachel Feinberg of the Feinberg Medical Group, a Functional Restoration Program (FRP) that features several wellness practices including Qigong and Tai Chi for people living with chronic pain  in the San Francisco Bay Area.

We express sincerest appreciation to both the Qigong Institute and Feinberg Medical Group for their support of Qigong and Tai Chi practice in clinical settings. To view all public comments, visit the Federal eRulemaking Portal at: 
www.regulations.gov using docket number - HHS-OS-2018-0027.

Tai Chi = Lower Risk of Falls

A recent article appearing in UK's The Telegraph states that research suggests retirees may cut the risk of falls by a fifth by practicing Tai Chi and other exercise programs, research suggests.

A study involving Oxford University found that elderly people enrolled in fitness classes to improve their strength were far less likely to end up suffering potentially deadly injuries.

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Harvard: The Health Benefits Of Tai Chi

The following groundbreaking article originally appeared in the Harvard Women's Health Watch publication in May, 2009. Updated in December of 2015 to include new research findings, it remains an excellent resource and respected introduction to the benefits of Tai Chi. 

The Health Benefits of Tai Chi

This gentle form of exercise can help maintain strength, flexibility, and balance, and could be the perfect activity for the rest of your life.

Tai chi is often described as "meditation in motion," but it might well be called "medication in motion." There is growing evidence that this mind-body practice, which originated in China as a martial art, has value in treating or preventing many health problems. And you can get started even if you aren't in top shape or the best of health.



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Tai Chi and Chronic Pain

Harvard Medical School Reports

Some solid research shows that tai chi can benefit people with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, tension headache, and other ongoing, painful conditions. In one trial, for example, 66 people with fibromyalgia were randomized into two groups: one group took tai chi classes twice a week, the other group attended wellness education and stretching sessions twice a week. After 12 weeks, those in the tai chi group reported less pain, fewer depression symptoms, and better sleep than the control group. The results were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Current Research

Qigong Institute Provides Valuable Research Information

Current research articles on Qigong, Tai Chi and other mind, body, spirit practices can easily be found at the Qigong Institute's website. Their Research Page includes helpful search features to help you locate articles on the specific topics you may be searching for.

The Qigong Institute is a 501c(3) not-for-profit organization dedicated to promoting the scientific understanding of the basis of Qigong through research and education. Since 1984 it has been a clearinghouse for related news and scientific facts to aid researchers, writers, Qigong practitioners and teachers, members of the Western medical community, and the members of the general public who are interested in learning more about Qigong and Tai Chi. It's goals are:

  • Promoting Qigong via education, research, & clinical studies
  • Improving healthcare by integrating Qigong and Western medicine
  • Making information on Qigong available to medical practitioners, scientists, the public, and policy makers
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